Learn something new every day

Janet Clapp
BOOKS CHECKED OUT

There is a book for almost every topic you can imagine. To help manage daily life, cookbooks have recipes, medical books provide information about health, how-to books instruct in do-it-yourself projects, and finance books will help you manage your money. There are books for most stages of life: childhood, adolescence, college, marriage, pregnancy, parenting, careers, retirement, old age, and death. For those who enjoy crafts, there are books about woodworking, quilting, and jewelry making. To learn about the world, there are books about history, culture, art and science. Below is a sample of the large array of subjects to be found on written pages shelved in the library.

What More Can I Say? Why Communication Fails and What to Do About It

by Dianna Booher

“But whatever term you prefer, communication is essentially about making things happen, getting action, changing behavior, or changing minds.” Booher offers nine principles of persuasive communication: trust, collaboration, simplicity, tact, potential, distinction, specificity, emotion and perspective. With multiple easy-to-understand examples, she suggests the most effective means for organizations and people to communicate their messages.

Stanley Plumbing: A Homeowner’s Guide

by Steve Cory

With numerous photographs, this how-to guide instructs you on simple things like unplugging drains, and more complicated tasks like installing a spa tub. Learn how a toilet works, how to install a sump pump, and replace a kitchen faucet using this straightforward guide. “If you are reasonably handy, ready to work carefully and systematically, and have the time to learn and perform a job, you can tackle most of the projects in this book. That includes almost every type of repair and upgrade to your existing system. This book will show you how.”

Healthcare Choices: 5 Steps to Getting the Medical Care You Want and Need

by Archelle Georgiou, MD

“The CARES model is a guided approach I developed to help my family and friends make medical decisions that balance the best medical treatments available with their personal priorities and preferences. This book allows me to share the model and the tools with you so that you too can get the healthcare you want, need, and deserve.” Accompanied by real patient questions and doctor tips, Georgiou outlines steps to take when looking at care options, aging, and shopping for health insurance. “Using CARES doesn’t mean being your own doctor or rejecting the advice of clinical professionals. It does mean having the self-confidence to identify and evaluate all your options so that you can be an active partner in your own health, advocate for yourself, and ultimately make the right healthcare decisions for you.”

People of the World: Cultures and Traditions, Ancestry and Identity

by Catherine Herbert Howell with K. David Harrison

“Human wisdom extends backward and forward in time and emanates from all quarters of the globe. No one culture or ethnic group, civilization or nation has a monopoly on understanding, intelligence, or innovation.” This National Geographic publication uses maps and pictures to enhance the descriptions of groups from Afrikaners in South Africa and Amish in the United States to Zapotec in Mexico.

Gem: The Definitive Visual Guide

This Smithsonian DK title offers beautiful photographs of colorful gems, ornaments, bowls and jewelry. “The precious metals and gemstones that have been used for decoration and trade throughout human history have their origin in the rocks that surround us. The financial worth and perceived value of these precious materials can vary from society to society.” Quotes, artwork, maps, timelines and more furnish additional information about the great variety of the world’s minerals.

Whether or not your New Year’s resolution is to learn something new, the Rutland Free Library has thousands of books on a wide span of subjects, in addition to the titles above. Happy learning, reading and doing!

Janet Clapp

Janet Clapp is an adult services librarian at Rutland Free Library.

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